Nurturing life through the body, heart, and spirit with the wisdom of Chinese medicine
IMG_0584.JPG

Blog

A collection of notes on the topics of classical Chinese, medicine, and traditional culture.
 

This blog is a collection of ruminations, translations, and personal opinions by Sabine and some guest authors. Reflecting my own personality, some posts are academic, some clinical, and some personal, some are excerpts from existing books and some may become part of future books. Please leave comments with feedback, questions, constructive criticism, and differences of opinion as long as you argue your reasons for disagreement logically. Any personal attacks, uncivil remarks, or self-promoting comments will be deleted.

Look through the Archive by Topic or Search the Blog:


Posts in guest post
Z'ev Rosenberg on "The Seminal Suwen Chapters: A Blueprint for Human and Ecological Health"

Guest blog by Z'ev Rosenberg from his brandnew Returning to the Source: Han Dynasty Medical Classics in Modern Clinical Practice: "The essential first three chapters of the Huang di nei jing Su wen set the stage for the core principles of Chinese medicine. These opening chapters contain the compass of life and medicine; the text reveals the equations that allow us to see how far we've deviated from the principles of life. As Wang Bing explains in his commentary of Chapter 3 in the Su wen:...

Read More
Allies: A poetic guest blog by Peter Firebrace

Allies
It seems we all need allies. The Lone Ranger had Silver, his faithful horse.
Davy Crockett had his coon-skin cap as well as his trusty rifle, Old Betsy.
Basho, Japan’s most famous poet, had the moon and a small boy I once saw
on the Moscow metro had a tiny hedgehog, which he kept in his pocket, but
brought out to stroke, much to the astonishment of his fellow passengers.
Maybe he reminded them of the value of friendship in an often hostile world.
Allies bring comfort, company and connection, a little personal touch of life
touching life that staves off that feeling of loneliness that seems such a
common undercurrent in people’s lives.

Read More
A Lactation Consultant's Perspective on Placenta Encapsulation

Guest blog by Sarah Hollister, RN, PHN, IBCLC: As a nurse and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), I have the opportunity to work with nearly every pregnant woman and new mom and baby at a group of four primary care health centers in Northern California. I would like to share my experience, concerns and request for collaboration to closely examine the new practice of placenta encapsulation, as it has grown to become a component of the postpartum experience for the new moms who I work with and throughout the United States. I have encountered assumptions that placenta consumption increases milk production, is a prevention for postpartum depression, and has existed in history as an ancient human practice. I will provide a summary here of the work I do and what I have found with my clients involving this practice.

Read More
Impressions of the Shén Nóng Běncǎo Jīng 神農本草經 by Z'ev Rosenberg

...this text should be on every herbalist’s desk, and would also serve as an excellent introduction to herbal medicine for acupuncture/ ’moxabustionists’ as well.  I’m looking forward to taking the Shen nong ben cao jing into the forests, as I commune with the plants and minerals in the fields.  Or as Zhuangzi once said, ‘cloud hidden, whereabouts unknown’.

Read More
Help Kids Be Who They Are

Guest blog by Lillian Pearl Bridges (www.lotusinstitute.com): As a mother, I wanted the best for my two sons and still do, even though they are now adults.  I too read all the parenting books to look for the best advice on how to be a good parent.  And of course the first person I turned to was my mother. I was raised in a Chinese family, but luckily I didn’t have a Tiger Mother, with incredibly high standards for education.  I had the Dragon Mother instead!  

Read More
Rotem Rakovsky: A Short Glimpse Into the Concept of Anxiety in Ancient Chinese Writings

Guest blog by Rotem Rakovsky.

"Anxiety is a fascinating term in Chinese medicine, although it is hardly ever studied and it appears in only few writings. This term describes a condition in which there is an involvement of the Upper Burner/ Shang Jiao and the Lower Burner/Xia Jiao in the body simultaneously, as the throbbing of the heart is accompanied by fear and a sense of quivering at the sides of the navel....

Read More
Guest Blog: A translation by Sumei Yi (edited by Eugene Anderson) of Gao Lian's Writings on Food and Drink

Gao Lian was a 16th-century playwright, litterateur and practitioner of the arts of healing and longevity. He wrote or compiled several treatises on these matters, collected in his “eight treatises” published in 1591 (Wikipedia).  The present translation is of the material on food and drink from this collection, including a good deal of alchemy and medicine. 

Gao’s approach is totally eclectic.  He reproduces a great mass of odd advice and recipes, many of the latter so hard to follow that one doubts strongly if Gao ever tried them or even knew anyone who had. Reproducing any old advice that might help someone live long was a Ming Dynasty practice.  In this book, thoroughly practical village advice is mixed with arcane alchemy.

The book is of interest largely to show what a refined gentleman of the 16th century would think worthy of attention, but some of the recipes are good or historically important.  

Read More
More on the Liu He 六合: Guest Post by Daniel Skyle

It is with great pleasure that Happy Goats shares this guest blog by Daniel Skyle on the "Liu He" 六合, which was inspired by my previous post and request for feedback. It's a longer article but very well worth the read!

Here's what Daniel has to say:

It was very interesting to read the translation from the Neijing and then the comment on the idea of liu he on Sabine Wilms´s website. When I read it, I realized how much the concept of liu he has percolated through my life. It has taken its place very firmly both in my practical training and in clinic, and, by extension, in how I always try to share it with my patients to help them.

In the neijiaquan – the Internal Martial Arts (IMA) – and in Daoist practice, liu he is a core concept. This then later evolved into skills that are put into clinic, both for our own health and to increase the effect of our treatments.

In this context liu he is often translated into English as ”the six harmonies”. In the IMA, these are three external harmonies and three internal harmonies (waisanhe and neisanhe) which are practiced again and again and again, until they are finally hardwired into the person´s very existence.

Read More
Forecast for the Year of the Wood Goat-Sheep (guest blog by Lillian Pearl Bridges

February 19, 2015 is the start of the Chinese Year of the Yin Wood Sheep or Green Sheep. The Sheep is fundamentally an Earth creature, so this year the elements of Wood and Earth are considered in conflict as Wood uses up Earth. However, the Wood Element also gets fed by Earth and therefore is a sign of steady growth for economies around the world. And, because it is Yin Wood, it will usher in more peace and calm. This will be a great relief after a turbulent and fast-paced Horse year. To many people, it may seem a bit boring. Remember that the Chinese consider boredom to be good luck because you have choices!

Read More